Aantares    Aantares BB  Hop To Forum Categories  Your Hobbies & Interests  Hop To Forums  Computing & Internet    Malwarebytes and slow start-up
Go To
Post
Search BB
Notify Me
TOS/Tools/Smilies
Reply
  
Malwarebytes and slow start-up
 Login/Register
 
Forum Host
Picture of DianeZ
posted
I have been using Malwarebytes Free for some time - have it on several computers. I was trying to restore an old XP desktop & noticed a significant slowdown at start-up after installing Malwarebytes (which found multiple threats after scanning this old PC). I unchecked several unnecessary start-up applications (checked each one on bleeping computer.com to see if it was necessary) & still slow start-up. Uninstalled Malwarebytes & start-up improved significantly. I have had a problem with slow start-up on my Windows 7 laptop. Since I use MB Free (which does not include "real-time protection"), I tweaked the settings in MB Free - to not load at start-up. Voila - start-up significantly improved.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
DianeZ
 
Posts: 1085 | Location: Maryland | Mbr Since: 09-22-2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Zealot...
posted Hide Post
 
"slow startup" is a relative term... how long 5, 10, 30 minutes or more? Operating System in use? Single/Dual/Quad-Core CPU and Clock Speed? How much RAM available? Hard Drive Capacity and what Percentage Free Space? Free of Malware?

Besides APPS running on a slower computer, and a badly fragmented hard drive... your Internet Connection speed (xx-Kbps, xx-Mbps, etc.) can affect how long it takes to BOOT-UP and do anti-malware UPDATES and then arrive at a "rest state" on the Windows' Desktop. Using LAN cable or WiFi or Bluetooth, etc., to connect to Internet?

I use Malwarebytes Premium, and 3 other Anti-malware products that ALL do updates upon Windows 10 Pro Startup on a very fast laptop... from time turning on COLD BOOT to all completed updates is typically less than 5 minutes (enough time to check snail mail, get coffee, or whatever). With all APPS OFF (i.e., Safe Mode boot) it takes about 45 seconds to get to the Desktop.

Have you ever used System Internal's autoruns.exe?

You can RUN that EXE and it will show you everything running at STARTUP (lots more than one typically expects). You can UNCHECK items and upon reboot those items will not be RUN at Startup. To re-enable, simply CHECK the item again and it will be RUN at Startup. If you UNCHECK an item, it won't be RUN at Startup, but it typically will work just fine if you click its ICON or RUN its executable manually (there may be a few exceptions, but I've never encountered a problem).

You can also DELETE items from the listing (but I typically don't do that). Surprisingly, you might find several (or many) items for which it cannot find a file to be RUN... typically those items were left in the REGISTRY or System/Startup folders when software was UPDATED or DELETED.

I suggest giving autoruns.exe a try-out and see what it might do for you.

hth - Karl

P.S.
The System Internals Suite might also be of interest to you?
 
 
Posts: 20589 | Location: VA | Mbr Since: 11-08-2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Zealot...
posted Hide Post
  deleted duplicate
 
Posts: 20589 | Location: VA | Mbr Since: 11-08-2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Zealot...
posted Hide Post
 
P.S.S.
Before running anti-malware SCANS I always use the Pro version of CCLEANER to cleanup tons of files (and errant Registry entries--having CCLEANER to do a BACKUP before deleting those entries) that aren't needed and that helps to speed-up the SCAN time.

The first time its RUN, it really makes a difference--I then RUN it every time before SCANNING for malware.

I just helped a neighbor do their computer... CCLEANER removed almost 5 GB of unneeded "crap" (and several errant Registry entries) before we SCANNED for Malware.
 
 
Posts: 20589 | Location: VA | Mbr Since: 11-08-2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Forum Host
Picture of DianeZ
posted Hide Post
Lots of variables. Toshiba Portege laptop, Windows 7 Home Premium SP 1, Intel Core i3 CPU M370 @ 2.40 GHz 2.40 GHz (yes, 2.40 GHz was listed twice, but system information did not say dual core), 4 GB RAM, 500 GB hard drive < 1/4 used space, cable internet, wifi connect. Using Microsoft Security Essentials AV, Malwarebytes Free & CCleaner Free. All three were loading at start-up, but none of the three did automatic updates or scans at startup. CC and MB Free would generate a pop-up if updates were available.

I had previously disabled many things (a lot of Toshiba proprietary stuff) in msconfig startup. It was still taking about 4 minutes or more from power on to usable browser window. With MB Free disabled in start-up, it is taking less than 2 minutes. I have not tried autoruns.exe.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
DianeZ
 
Posts: 1085 | Location: Maryland | Mbr Since: 09-22-2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Zealot...
posted Hide Post
 
Yes, LOTS of variables indeed! I still keep my Windows 7 (dual core) handy as a backup in case this system crashes... but it simply can not perform the way my Windows 10 Pro laptop does (Quad-Core, 16 GB RAM, dedicated 4 GB Video RAM, 2 TB Hard drive, etc.).

WiFi itself could present a connection speed problem. Try running a CAT 5/6/7 LAN cable to your laptop (and compare the throughput connection speed difference, between WIRED and WiFi). I use speedtest.net. I'm paying for FiOS 75 Mbps Up & Down (I just ran a LAN Cable test and... 2ms PING - 83.52 Mbps Down - 91.33 Mbps Up).

My laptop and router are DUAL BAND (802.11ac)... I can potentially come close to the above over WiFi. However; depending on placement of the laptop relative to the placement of the router... using WiFi (instead of LAN Cable) I can get way less than the speed for which I am paying.

The further from the router, the laptop is... the weaker the signal/speed... and if not DUAL BAND capable (which your laptop & router might not be), then there also could be interference on the 2.4 GHz WiFi channels (from smart devices, cordless phones, nearby users & WiFi networks using the same Channel)... interference which might not be there to degrade your connection on the 5 GHz channels.

Another good utility for "monitoring" a variety of potential problems with Windows hardware & resources, is lifehacker recommended: rainmeter

Microsoft ended full support for Windows 7 almost 3 years ago. The LINKED website might also hold some tips that will help you get more performance from that OS.

Overall, a Windows 7 system typically is not "up to" handling today's available stuff (and the problem only will get worse with more bloated software & multiple updates demanding more & more system resources, storage and bandwidth).

hth - Karl
 
Posts: 20589 | Location: VA | Mbr Since: 11-08-2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Forum Host
Picture of DianeZ
posted Hide Post
I am not getting speeds anywhere near those. Cheap dlink router & laptop is not in close proximity to the router. Connection is good/fair, but rarely excellent. I have other computers running Windows 10, but I still like this Windows 7 laptop. Want to keep it in the best condition I can.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
DianeZ
 
Posts: 1085 | Location: Maryland | Mbr Since: 09-22-2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Zealot...
posted Hide Post
 
I understand... I keep my Win7 laptop's software updated too, but I don't use it much at all (it serves as a standby in case the Win10 laptop crashes).

1. If you have Cellphone Service with UNLIMITED data... you could use the FoxFi and PdaNet bundled APPS, on your phone and then use bluetooth-pairing or usb-tethering or your phone's WiFi to connect your other devices through your phone to the Internet. These APPS turn your Cellphone into a WiFi HOTSPOT without having to pay anything to your Cell-Carrier for use of their Mobile HOTSPOT services. IOW: with your phone being a mobile hotspot, using its unlimited data plan, you might get better Internet Connection Speed (typically 8+ Mbps Down) than you get with your router's WiFi. And, you can go anywhere using this setup!

2. You could deploy an IN HOME WiFi Extender that uses your HOME WIRING to extend your Internet Connection Range with NO LOSS (that you may get with WiFi). Typically, you plug one unit into 120 VAC for power, and then connect it via LAN Cable to your router. Then you take the SECOND unit and go anywhere in your home/garage/shed/outdoor where there is a 120 VAC outlet and plug it in there. Now, while sitting in close proximity (just a few feet away) from that SECOND unit... your DEVICE (laptop or other) communicating with it... you'll have nearly the same internet speed as if you were plugged directly into your cable modem/router.

So a couple of years ago, I bought Netgear's PowerLINE 1000 + WiFi... Wifey likes to go out in the yard/garden (where my FiOS WiFi signal drops off significantly). But, with the SECOND unit nearby... she has no problem using her iPad being WiFi connected to the Internet.

In summary:

#1. Using your Cell-data and the Phone as a HOTSPOT, there's no additional cost (you use the DATA for which you've already paid). And, if paying $15 to $20 per month for their HOTSPOT access, you could cancel that and $AVE!

#2. Using a HOME WIRING (your electrical ac power line) WiFi extender, there is the additional cost of buying one... but the Internet Speed will be the same as if you were connected directly to your router... in my case that's well over 75+ Mbps Up & Down. For a while, I did use the FiOS Gigabit plan and got well over 900 Mbps up & Down.

hth - Karl
 
 
Posts: 20589 | Location: VA | Mbr Since: 11-08-2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Forum Host
Picture of DianeZ
posted Hide Post
I have used the mobile hotspot with my iPhone to tether my laptop.

My son set up the wired LAN years ago when we got cable internet. Current router is a d-link DIR-601 wireless N. Two problems with the wireless. Signal is weak in some areas of the house & I can't change the location of the router. The iPhone indicates weak security (WPA). I was unable to change the setting to WPA2.

Do you have any recommendations to upgrade my router & add a wifi extender (looked at the one from the link above) Trying to determine what would be compatible with my devices. Do I need wireless AC or stay with wireless N?

1. Windows 10 Tower Gaming PC (LAN - don't really use it for games)
2. Microsoft Surface - Windows 10 (Wifi)
3. Windows 7 Laptop (Wifi)
4. Roku 2 device on analog TV (Wifi)
5. iPhone 6S Plus (Wifi)
6. Wii, original XBOX & XBOX 360 Kinect (Wifi - rarely use)
7. Test laptops/PCs - Windows XP/7(LAN- occasional use)


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
DianeZ
 
Posts: 1085 | Location: Maryland | Mbr Since: 09-22-2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Forum Host
Picture of DianeZ
posted Hide Post
Interesting results from speedtest
Windows 10 PC - Dining Room (LAN)
Ping 14 ms - Download 15.61 Mbps - Upload 2.08 Mbps
Windows 10 - Surface - Dining Room (WiFi) close to router
Ping 15 ms - Download 16.24 Mbps - Upload 2.12 Mbps
Windows 7 laptop - bedroom (LAN)
Ping 22 ms - Download 16.26 Mbps - Upload 1.99 Mbps
Windows 7 laptiop - bedroom (WiFi) farther from router
Ping 15 ms - Download 8.11 Mbps - Upload 2.09 Mbps

I have watch, surf & talk 15 bundle from Broadstripe so my speeds are what I pay for, but there is a definite drop in signal between the Dining Room & bedroom.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
DianeZ
 
Posts: 1085 | Location: Maryland | Mbr Since: 09-22-2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Zealot...
posted Hide Post
 
"I have watch, surf & talk 15 bundle from Broadstripe"

Does that mean 15 Mbps Downstream? (I looked at their plans/speeds - https://broadstripe.com/services/#internet)

Those SPEEDTEST.NET results look to be acceptable for a 15 Mbps "cable" plan. As their chart indicates, the more devices you are USING at the same time, the more speed would be the better choice. Another factor that affects connectivity is network latency. Years ago, when I had COX Cable and a 15 Mbps Down package, the lag time (latency) to connect to websites was unacceptable. It took COX field techs & engineers more than a week to identify and correct their (not my) problem.

The thing with "Cable" providers is that the more people/devices that are being used simultaneously, the more performance drops off. I used to see that happen, noticeably, when neighborhood kids got home from school and people got home from work. That's a major reason I opted to switch to Verizon FiOS (with FiOS, that drop-off never happens because of the difference in the way Cable & FiOS networks are structured).

Bottom-line? Just because "broadstripe" (or any ISP) advertises some package speed, that doesn't mean their networks will deliver acceptable latency... periodically check that for yourself. I use a free utility from Lee Hite (a *P Special Contributor) inetbench to measure throughput and inetbench's TOOLS to measure PING and TRACERT parameters. I also use the "speedtest.net" site on my phone and laptop to test my network connection (at random times).

For Internet connectivity (to Cable, FiOS, whatever) I plan for 10 Mbps down, for each device, and at times having a half-dozen or more devices being utilized at the same time (when family/friends come to visit)... thus I have the FiOS 75 Mbps package. As more "stuff" (for example 4K video) gets pumped through Internet pipes, I might have to go back to FiOS' "gigabit" (Cellphones will be offering that in the near future, with speeds around 600 Mbps being typical).

Also, consider: if you have multiple devices using WiFi at the same time... the 802.11ac standard will best serve you.

See this July 2014 article: WiFi Standards 802.11a/b/g/n vs. 802.11ac.

I think that your CABLE provider should have an upgrade for the Cable Modem which should also be a WiFi router of the 802.11ac standard. An "ac" router is backward compatible with previous standards/devices (802.11-a/b/g/n).

Given that your CABLE provider does have such an upgrade, you typically don't have to "rent" it for a monthly fee. You can buy acceptable MODELS outright, from them OR buy from a different (cheaper) source... and you typically can install it yourself (then call their customer support to have it "provisioned" it on their network).

Once you have a CABLE Modem/Router, of the 802.11ac standard installed, you should enjoy better (yet, perhaps not "100% perfect") WiFi throughout your home. However; if you need to address any "dead" spots, that's where adding a device which uses your HOUSE WIRING comes into play. There are other similar models from other manufactures, but my "Netgear PL1000 + WiFi" has never failed me (or wifey).

The PL1000's SECOND device (plugged anywhere into any 120 VAC outlet) has a LAN CABLE socket (for your devices that are not WiFi capable) and it's also WiFi capable.

So, your older devices which might only be 802.11b or 802.11g or 802.11n will still communicate with the latest standard (802.11ac) devices. The older standards only use the 2.4 GHz frequency band... so do many other devices... so there is more competition for "clean channels" on that frequency band.

However; if any of your devices are 802.11ac capable (the iPhone? the Win10 computer? etc.) they'll be able to WiFi connect utilizing the 5 GHz band's "clean channels".

hth - Karl
 
 
Posts: 20589 | Location: VA | Mbr Since: 11-08-2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Forum Host
Picture of DianeZ
posted Hide Post
Getting far afield from original discussion, but appreciate the advice. I remember Lee - I used to frequent the Member Help BB. I am in a semi-rural area - only about 8 houses on my street. My options are Broadstripe, Fios or satellite. I have looked into changing to Fios, but hubby does not want to switch TV cable providers. I am the only one in the house using the WiFi. Never really noticed lag or at least not recently) except for Black Friday/Cyber Monday. My current cable modem is a phone router, but the LAN/wireless router is a separate device. Maybe they can upgrade it.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
DianeZ
 
Posts: 1085 | Location: Maryland | Mbr Since: 09-22-2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Zealot...
posted Hide Post
 
I will be very surprised if they don't have modem/router with 802.11ac WiFi built into their box. That would be the first thing to upgrade and might provide completely satisfactory results (see about getting their 60 or 100 Mbps plan at the same time). The additional speed will be necessary as more "stuff" demands more speed!

With Cable upload speed is terrible... but with FiOS it is equal to download speed. That only becomes important when there is a LOT to be uploaded (GBs to be backed-up to remote servers; such as a cloud, for example).

They're more willing to cut you a better price deal IF you ask to speak with a Customer Loyalty/Retention representative... telling them the UPGRADE that you desire AND that you are talking with FiOS about switching. They are "bleeding customers" due to Antenna TV and competition from FiOS and Satellite. Make that work to your advantage! Wink   ;)

I recently helped two friends switch to FiOS. They were reluctant because they didn't want to deal with changing their email addresses. We setup GMAIL for them, notified their contacts AND accounts (banks, credit cards, etc.) to use the GMAIL addys... and then had them negotiate with COX and FiOS. As for Cable TV vs FiOS TV programming... look at what is really "watched" on Cable and see if a FiOS package will suffice?

- hth Karl
 
 
Posts: 20589 | Location: VA | Mbr Since: 11-08-2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Forum Host
Picture of DianeZ
posted Hide Post
Not going to get the combo router through the cable co. They wanted to charge me a service call & a monthly fee for router service. Haven't called Verizon yet, but I will. One of the downsides of changing to Verizon is that I have 5 TVs. 3 are connected directly to the cable without a box. These receive limited # of channels - basic 1-99. My understanding with FIOS I could not do a direct connect - would need a box for every TV.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
DianeZ
 
Posts: 1085 | Location: Maryland | Mbr Since: 09-22-2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Zealot...
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by DianeZ:
Not going to get the combo router through the cable co. They wanted to charge me a service call & a monthly fee for router service. Haven't called Verizon yet, but I will. One of the downsides of changing to Verizon is that I have 5 TVs. 3 are connected directly to the cable without a box. These receive limited # of channels - basic 1-99. My understanding with FIOS I could not do a direct connect - would need a box for every TV.
I'm not sure how FiOS TV is managed, from region to region, but:

I got the FiOS "bundle" (most basic TV package and Internet--no landline phone) because that was cheaper than just Internet by itself.

I can plug directly into my TV (digital, not analog), no FiOS BOX needed, and get some 20 or so channels. But, I get more channels and programming over-the-airwaves, so I don't bother doing that. I'm on pretty good terms with the local FiOS office personnel. They gave me the following suggestion:

When "company comes" (over the holidays, for example) and people want to watch their favorite programs (simultaneously, on different TVs)... just go to their office (about 10 minutes from me), get a box or several (one for each TV set) and be BILLED the fee ($12.50 per month, per box, IIRC). Then when "company leaves", just return the boxes to them (at the local office). They said MANY of their customers do this and it is not a problem.
 
 
Posts: 20589 | Location: VA | Mbr Since: 11-08-2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
  Powered by Social Strata  
 

    Aantares    Aantares BB  Hop To Forum Categories  Your Hobbies & Interests  Hop To Forums  Computing & Internet    Malwarebytes and slow start-up

© 2003-2017 Aantares Online LLC. All Rights Reserved.