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I live in northern Idaho, with a growing season that usually runs from June to August. We think of ways of extending the season by indoor greenhouses and outdoor row covers. This is the first year that I have ever tried growing tomatoes from seed. So far so good. However, with our short season, we usually have problems with the first frost coming before tomatoes turn red.

How is your garden growing? Are you trying anything new this year?


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Vicki
 
Posts: 398 | Location: Idaho | Mbr Since: 05-01-2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by Vicki:
I live in northern Idaho, with a growing season that usually runs from June to August. We think of ways of extending the season by indoor greenhouses and outdoor row covers. This is the first year that I have ever tried growing tomatoes from seed. So far so good. However, with our short season, we usually have problems with the first frost coming before tomatoes turn red.

How is your garden growing? Are you trying anything new this year?

Did you plant seeds for early tomatoes? I hope so or you may be disappointed Cry   :cry:

If you should decide to try heirloom tomatoes, PLEASE buy plants? They usually produce late and have considerably fewer tomatoes than hybrid. But Oh My Goodness, they are good!

Didn't plant any this year because it has been way too wet, and I'm all too familiar with that disappointment, thank you very much! But I grew Mortgage Lifer, Brandy Wine, Black Krim, and Pineapple tomatoes for several years.

Several dogs broke into my back yard and destroyed all my herb plants. Was especially fond of the Rosemary and Lemon Balm plants and I'd had them for years.


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Fence straddlers get a crotch full of splinters -- Granny
 
Posts: 4056 | Location: Atlanta | Mbr Since: 05-01-2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Zone 8a:
Currently reaping: plums, blackberries, peas, snap beans, lettuce, onions, sour cherries (the bing cherries didn't do so well... blossomed before pollinators were out & about) and oregano, rosemary, peppermint, catnip-mint, among other things.

No okra, tomatoes or white & sweet potatoes yet. We'll also have blueberries, figs & pears soon (in a month or so).
 
 
Posts: 24927 | Location: VA | Mbr Since: 11-08-2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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JR,

I started a variety of tomato from seed called Mr. Stripey. I don't know if it is an heirloom tomato or not. My daughter gave me an interesting box of different seeds known for color: rainbow swiss chard, purple carrots, red brussel sprouts, gold zucchini. The only colorful vegetable seeds I didn't plant was the gold zucchini. We don't need more zucchini, even if it is gold.

We bought a special variety of tomato called, Kootenay. It is supposed to be specially cross bred for our particular climate. It all depends on how long our season will be this year and if we can extended it. Some years, we have picked the tomatoes green, layered them in newspapers in boxes and put them in our pantry which is dark. Some will turn red, while others go bad. Not sure if it is worth the trouble since even the tomatoes that turn red don't taste as good as the ones that ripen on the vine.


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Vicki
 
Posts: 398 | Location: Idaho | Mbr Since: 05-01-2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Anti=Fascism,

The only items that we have harvested so far from our garden is spinach and asparagus. Our strawberries are slowly turning red though. It shouldn't be long.

Our prune plum up and died last year, with plums on the tree. It had been producing every years, for about 7 years, I think. It must have caught a disease.

I envy you your ability to grow blueberries. They grow around here, but we just can't grow them. However, there is a U pick blueberry farm not far away, where we go and enjoy each other's company while picking blueberries. I love blueberry cobbler. They also taste good in my yogurt.


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Vicki
 
Posts: 398 | Location: Idaho | Mbr Since: 05-01-2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by Vicki:
I started a variety of tomato from seed called Mr. Stripey. I don't know if it is an heirloom tomato or not.

Yes, Mr. Stripey is an heirloom:
https://www.burpee.com/vegetab...ipey-prod001902.html

quote:
Some years, we have picked the tomatoes green, layered them in newspapers in boxes and put them in our pantry which is dark. Some will turn red, while others go bad. Not sure if it is worth the trouble since even the tomatoes that turn red don't taste as good as the ones that ripen on the vine.

That's when we in the South make fried green tomatoes!

If you want them to turn red, it is best to place them stem side down on a sunny windowsill, but move them away from the window if it will get near freezing on the sill overnight. That works best for tomatoes that already have a bit of color showing though. The flavor still won't be as strong as a vine ripened one, but they won't taste like water either.

A couple of years I made tomato sauce and/or soup because there was so many of them. Heirlooms don't work so well for this though...especially if they have an "off" color. The sauce or soup will look "muddy."


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Fence straddlers get a crotch full of splinters -- Granny
 
Posts: 4056 | Location: Atlanta | Mbr Since: 05-01-2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Vicki:
JR,

I started a variety of tomato from seed called Mr. Stripey. I don't know if it is an heirloom tomato or not. My daughter gave me an interesting box of different seeds known for color: rainbow swiss chard, purple carrots, red brussel sprouts, gold zucchini. The only colorful vegetable seeds I didn't plant was the gold zucchini. We don't need more zucchini, even if it is gold.

We bought a special variety of tomato called, Kootenay. It is supposed to be specially cross bred for our particular climate. It all depends on how long our season will be this year and if we can extended it. Some years, we have picked the tomatoes green, layered them in newspapers in boxes and put them in our pantry which is dark. Some will turn red, while others go bad. Not sure if it is worth the trouble since even the tomatoes that turn red don't taste as good as the ones that ripen on the vine.


I think that’s where fried green tomatoes comes from!
 
Posts: 5015 | Location: Central PA | Mbr Since: 05-14-2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by That JR Thang:
quote:
Originally posted by Vicki:
I started a variety of tomato from seed called Mr. Stripey. I don't know if it is an heirloom tomato or not.

Yes, Mr. Stripey is an heirloom:
https://www.burpee.com/vegetab...ipey-prod001902.html

quote:
Some years, we have picked the tomatoes green, layered them in newspapers in boxes and put them in our pantry which is dark. Some will turn red, while others go bad. Not sure if it is worth the trouble since even the tomatoes that turn red don't taste as good as the ones that ripen on the vine.

That's when we in the South make fried green tomatoes!

If you want them to turn red, it is best to place them stem side down on a sunny windowsill, but move them away from the window if it will get near freezing on the sill overnight. That works best for tomatoes that already have a bit of color showing though. The flavor still won't be as strong as a vine ripened one, but they won't taste like water either.

A couple of years I made tomato sauce and/or soup because there was so many of them. Heirlooms don't work so well for this though...especially if they have an "off" color. The sauce or soup will look "muddy."


I see you beat me to it!
 
Posts: 5015 | Location: Central PA | Mbr Since: 05-14-2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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JR, I like your idea about what to do with tomatoes that are just beginning to turn and the frost warnings are out. I will try that this next season if it turns out to be a short one.


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Vicki
 
Posts: 398 | Location: Idaho | Mbr Since: 05-01-2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Reed, yes fried green tomatoes are good. Since we know that we do have a tomato ripening problem, we tend to buy cases of tomatoes which my husband cans when we run low on tomato sauce. We order them from our local produce stand, which buys the tomatoes from Washington farms.


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Vicki
 
Posts: 398 | Location: Idaho | Mbr Since: 05-01-2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by Vicki:
Reed, yes fried green tomatoes are good. Since we know that we do have a tomato ripening problem, we tend to buy cases of tomatoes which my husband cans when we run low on tomato sauce. We order them from our local produce stand, which buys the tomatoes from Washington farms.
 
Posts: 5015 | Location: Central PA | Mbr Since: 05-14-2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Today, if all goes according to plan, we will be planting garbanzo beans and yellow Indian woman beans. We are finally getting a stretch of warm weather.

A couple of days ago it was cold enough to try out our new wood burning stove, which replaced our old wood pellet stove. This is going to take some practice, as it got so hot that we had to sit in the next room.


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Vicki
 
Posts: 398 | Location: Idaho | Mbr Since: 05-01-2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by Vicki:
Today, if all goes according to plan, we will be planting garbanzo beans and yellow Indian woman beans. We are finally getting a stretch of warm weather.

A couple of days ago it was cold enough to try out our new wood burning stove, which replaced our old wood pellet stove. This is going to take some practice, as it got so hot that we had to sit in the next room.

Here, if it ain't planted already, it's not gonna get planted. Supposed to be 91 today with humidity of 65%. Gonna feel like 100 by around 4-5 O'clock. Too hot to even breathe, let alone plant anything!


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Fence straddlers get a crotch full of splinters -- Granny
 
Posts: 4056 | Location: Atlanta | Mbr Since: 05-01-2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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JR,

Yesterday turned out to be rainy and in the 60s, which sure sounds better that your 91 degrees, although my laundry on the line didn't get dry.


We are heading toward warmer temperatures by Wednesday, if the weather report can be believed.


What are your strategies for staying cool? Do you have air conditioning?


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Vicki
 
Posts: 398 | Location: Idaho | Mbr Since: 05-01-2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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JR,

Yesterday turned out to be rainy and in the 60s, which sure sounds better that your 91 degrees, although my laundry on the line didn't get dry.


We are heading toward warmer temperatures by Wednesday, if the weather report can be believed.


What are your strategies for staying cool? Do you have air conditioning?

I could handle 60 and rainy!

Dahlin', If I didn't have AC, I would have turned into a puddle long ago. I simply wouldn't live here without AC. It would be unbearable to me.

In late Spring through early Fall, I generally stay indoors in the AC except for very short (5-10 minutes) outdoors. Like to and from the car, mailbox, or back steps to feed the cats!

With all the rain and heat, the mosquitoes are horrific this year. I have to spray the air with a mixture of water, peppermint oil, and a dab of dish washing liquid just to go out the back door to feed the cats and change their water. Otherwise, I'd be eaten alive. When going to the mailbox, I put a dab of peppermint oil on my temples, neck, elbows, wrists, and bottom lip, just to walk down the driveway.

For longer periods outdoors, you can use Magnesium Oil, which has no scent, but can be difficult to find locally. I get mine from Amazon:
Magnesium Oil


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Fence straddlers get a crotch full of splinters -- Granny
 
Posts: 4056 | Location: Atlanta | Mbr Since: 05-01-2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Rainy days and Mondays...
 
Posts: 8959 | Location: Colorado | Mbr Since: 10-17-2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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JR,

Our mosquitoes are bad here, too. I am very tempted to try your strategies. I have to 'gear up' for the garden. I found gloves that go up past my elbows and I wear jeans and tennis shoes, but I can't wear gloves on my face, obviously. Those pesky critters like to hide in the strawberries and get me when I go out to pick them.


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Vicki
 
Posts: 398 | Location: Idaho | Mbr Since: 05-01-2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Henry J,

That's exactly the way it was on Monday in northern Idaho. Smile   :)


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Vicki
 
Posts: 398 | Location: Idaho | Mbr Since: 05-01-2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by Vicki:
JR,

Our mosquitoes are bad here, too. I am very tempted to try your strategies. I have to 'gear up' for the garden. I found gloves that go up past my elbows and I wear jeans and tennis shoes, but I can't wear gloves on my face, obviously. Those pesky critters like to hide in the strawberries and get me when I go out to pick them.


They are attracted by carbon dioxide. Biput, I don’t think not breathing is a good solution!
 
Posts: 5015 | Location: Central PA | Mbr Since: 05-14-2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Reed,

lol


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Vicki
 
Posts: 398 | Location: Idaho | Mbr Since: 05-01-2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Reed,

lol


I’ve been tempted in the BWCAW in Minnesquito!
 
Posts: 5015 | Location: Central PA | Mbr Since: 05-14-2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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In late Spring through early Fall, I generally stay indoors in the AC except for very short (5-10 minutes) outdoors. Like to and from the car, mailbox, or back steps to feed the cats!

With all the rain and heat, the mosquitoes are horrific this year. I have to spray the air with a mixture of water, peppermint oil, and a dab of dish washing liquid just to go out the back door to feed the cats and change their water. Otherwise, I'd be eaten alive.

JR, what proportions of water, peppermint oil, and dish washing liquid do you use in your mixture and is this something you spray at the insects or do you spray it on your clothes?


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Vicki
 
Posts: 398 | Location: Idaho | Mbr Since: 05-01-2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by Vicki:
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Originally posted by JR: In late Spring through early Fall, I generally stay indoors in the AC except for very short (5-10 minutes) outdoors. Like to and from the car, mailbox, or back steps to feed the cats!

With all the rain and heat, the mosquitoes are horrific this year. I have to spray the air with a mixture of water, peppermint oil, and a dab of dish washing liquid just to go out the back door to feed the cats and change their water. Otherwise, I'd be eaten alive.


JR, what proportions of water, peppermint oil, and dish washing liquid do you use in your mixture and is this something you spray at the insects or do you spray it on your clothes?

I use a 16 oz spray bottle like this
Spray Bottle
with 2-3, but up to 5 droppers full from a 4 oz bottle of Peppermint Oil like this
Peppermint Oil
and maybe a scant teaspoon of Dawn dish washing liquid.

I turn the nozzle to a fairly fine mist and spray the air. It will only work as long as the mist is suspended, so you will have to spray often if you are going to be out for a while. You can also use it to spray your clothing, but the warmer it is, the faster it evaporates, so spray often. And if you can hit any of the nasty little vampires with some of the spray, good for you! It will usually kill them if your solution is strong enough because they breathe through their skin, and since they find the oil irritating, they will close their breathing apparatus against it, and suffocate themselves.

I've actually killed a couple of large roaches by dropping a single drop of the oil straight from the bottle on them. It will also repel ants if you strategically place a few cotton balls with drops of peppermint oil (clove or orange oil also works well) in the ant trails. I have a problem with them coming into my kitchen in early Spring, so I just put a drop on each corner of my stainless steel sink every other day. No more ants!

Check out this site for more info on essential oils as bug spray: http://www.naturallivingideas....to-repel-bugs-pests/


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Fence straddlers get a crotch full of splinters -- Granny
 
Posts: 4056 | Location: Atlanta | Mbr Since: 05-01-2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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JR, thanks.


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Vicki
 
Posts: 398 | Location: Idaho | Mbr Since: 05-01-2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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