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Devoted...
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quote:
Originally posted by Reed N D Dark:
quote:


We need to remember just how much time those ancestors had on their hands. A few hours hunter-gathering, then how does one fill in time?


You’re kidding? At least my education never led me to assume our ancestors had much time on their hands. Hunting could take days or weeks, even once there were groups. Perhaps a lot of waiting as there is in deer season here, but one stil must be alert to the area around them while filling time.

As for the gathers, I can’t imagine that much time to fill either. It takes a lot of fruits and vegetables to make a meal. And if one has figured out how to store them, or gone on to working with grasses/grains there’s work to be done with those.

I just don’t see our distant relatives needing to fill time but rather spending time finding food and eating and sleeping. The timing of our becoming communal is warped in our history books, but it seems to me that we came to being communal before being a distinct species. That means we should have been splitting the work needed to survive which implies there was too much to do alone!


No doubt there would have been those who did it tough, however I have seen many examples where life was indeed full of spare time. Men and women in Ten Canoes had it anything but tough, and even in the Kalahari I saw a documentary in which three men spent eight hours chasing and killing an antelope which would have fed the tribe for days.

Remember, too, these were fit people. How much sleep would they have needed at night, after everyone was fed and the sun had set?

They had far more time on their hands than we can possibly imagine.

Shelter? A few branches would have done. Clothing? How much time to make a lap-lap? Then look at the elaborate costumes in regions such as the Torres Strait. Can't be too pressed for time when creating these:
https://www.google.com/search?...kINg&biw=890&bih=908

In addition, there were times during the year when they held elaborate ritualistic ceremonies which went on for days. Check the Australian Corroborees.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corroboree

How long would it have taken to carve those huge totem poles you know so well?
 
Posts: 5046 | Location: Queensland, Australia | Mbr Since: 05-05-2017Report This Post
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Originally posted by bluelamp:
A few Tunguska-like blasts wiping out your towers, etc. will certainly get you looking up at the sky proactively. Combine the Josephus winds with the Central American thunder knocking down towers and it's much like the Thunderbird myths Tunguska locals related to the event.

As for the three paths: Hebrew religion tends to get back towards Noah/Atlantis via Zoroaster; Hebrew history (for me) tends to get back towards Noah/Atalantis via Hittite Kings; and the Hebrew social group tends to get back towards Noah/Atlantis via nomadic groups:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Habiru

The biblical word "Hebrew", like Habiru, denotes a social category, not an ethnic group.[15] Since the discovery of the 2nd millennium BCE inscriptions mentioning the Habiru, there have been many theories linking these to the Hebrews of the Bible, but these are now thought by many scholars to have no foundation.[16] Most modern scholars see the 'Apiru/Habiru as potentially one element in an early Israel composed of many different peoples, including nomadic Shasu, the biblical Midianites, Kenites and Amalakites, runaway slaves from Egypt, and displaced peasants and pastoralists.



I really do not understand why you focus so much on the Hebrews. After all, they were a rebellious breakaway group of Semites who spent most of their time trailing their goat herds around the Fertile Crescent, where they cobbled together bits and pieces from the mythologies of everyone from Egypt to Sumer.

Mythology has the major aim of uniting people and, as we still see every day, the Abrahamic religions have failed dismally in this.

Certainly they have picked up valuable lessons from the greater civilisations, but they broke the sacred law by creating disunity, even among their own people, a disunity which endangers us all today.

Even the Romans, with their world-controlling military and economic power, had no problem with the beliefs of most they conquered.

It is a clear example they had no real issues with the Jews when we see how they went out of their way to eliminate the Druid priests, whom they saw as a real political threat. The Jews, like the later Christians, were looked upon as atheistic heathens.

By all means focus on the true spiritual religions which developed thousands of years after we settled down to farming, but remember how many of those Middle East city States fought only to expand their territories, not to eliminate the religions of others.

quote:
Enmerkar of Uruk is building a massive ziggurat in Eridu and demands a tribute of precious materials from Aratta for its construction, at one point reciting an incantation imploring the god Enki to restore (or in Kramer's translation, to disrupt) the linguistic unity of the inhabited regions — named as Shubur, Hamazi, Sumer, Uri-ki (Akkad), and the Martu land, "the whole universe, the well-guarded people — may they all address Enlil together in a single language."

This Sumerian version talks about the language unity in terms of addressing Enlil so I tend to think it's more a spiritual unity missing rather than a human to human speaking one and the missing unity is there before construction of the tower and building the tower relates to restoring/disrupting it.


For me, that is the area we need to focus on, so far as that particular region of the world is concerned. We need to know more about the origin of the Sumerians, more, too, about the important Indo-Europeans who helped change the region.
 
Posts: 5046 | Location: Queensland, Australia | Mbr Since: 05-05-2017Report This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by That JR Thang:
quote:
Originally posted by Allan:
quote:
Originally posted by That JR Thang:
https://ffilms.org/red-obsession-2013/


I thank you. Looking forward to sharing all your thoughts.

Hmmm, was still a bit woozy from the muscle relaxers when I was watching, but viewing wine as "art" is just so messed up, IMHO. To pay $50,000 for a bottle of consumable "art" goes beyond any measure of sense to me. That is not to say that there isn't an art to making fine wines, but to view the product itself as art is where I take issue, especially since much depends on the weather for which the artists can take no credit.

Investing in wine production makes sense to me but bottled wine as an investment just blows my mind. It's not like a painting or statue that can be admired for centuries. I mean, it HAS to be consumed in order to be appreciated!

That China has determined to get in on the production of fine red wines will likely bring the prices back to some measure of affordability, but it could also saturate the market with more wine than purchase power. And then the bottom will fall out and the bubble will pop again.

And then there is that global warming issue to be dealt with. Read somewhere recently that within the next generation hops, coffee and cocoa will have become a thing of the past for lack of proper climate conditions. Boy, will that be a day to go down in infamy! And no wine by which to comfort yourself...

doomsday


Since hops can and was used to make bad water safe to drink, I can envision the need for more of it in the reasonably near future.
 
Posts: 12607 | Location: Central PA | Mbr Since: 05-14-2017Report This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Allan:
quote:
Originally posted by Reed N D Dark:
quote:


We need to remember just how much time those ancestors had on their hands. A few hours hunter-gathering, then how does one fill in time?


You’re kidding? At least my education never led me to assume our ancestors had much time on their hands. Hunting could take days or weeks, even once there were groups. Perhaps a lot of waiting as there is in deer season here, but one stil must be alert to the area around them while filling time.

As for the gathers, I can’t imagine that much time to fill either. It takes a lot of fruits and vegetables to make a meal. And if one has figured out how to store them, or gone on to working with grasses/grains there’s work to be done with those.

I just don’t see our distant relatives needing to fill time but rather spending time finding food and eating and sleeping. The timing of our becoming communal is warped in our history books, but it seems to me that we came to being communal before being a distinct species. That means we should have been splitting the work needed to survive which implies there was too much to do alone!


No doubt there would have been those who did it tough, however I have seen many examples where life was indeed full of spare time. Men and women in Ten Canoes had it anything but tough, and even in the Kalahari I saw a documentary in which three men spent eight hours chasing and killing an antelope which would have fed the tribe for days.

Remember, too, these were fit people. How much sleep would they have needed at night, after everyone was fed and the sun had set?

They had far more time on their hands than we can possibly imagine.

Shelter? A few branches would have done. Clothing? How much time to make a lap-lap? Then look at the elaborate costumes in regions such as the Torres Strait. Can't be too pressed for time when creating these:
https://www.google.com/search?...kINg&biw=890&bih=908

In addition, there were times during the year when they held elaborate ritualistic ceremonies which went on for days. Check the Australian Corroborees.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corroboree

How long would it have taken to carve those huge totem poles you know so well?


We know, from sociologist that there were men who taught young women the skills of tanning and sewing and perhaps cooking. This was an honored position but it brings into question why these skills weren’t being learned from the parents, if they had the time which I’ve been told they didn’t really. Hunters of larger animals could spend days looking for prey in order to feed the tribe. The work of preparing and preserving the meat had to be done quickly in some sense, but preservation was also done. The entire animal was used so there were tools to make tent repairs to be made or clothing to be made.
 
Posts: 12607 | Location: Central PA | Mbr Since: 05-14-2017Report This Post
Devoted...
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quote:
Originally posted by Reed N D Dark:
We know, from sociologist that there were men who taught young women the skills of tanning and sewing and perhaps cooking. This was an honored position but it brings into question why these skills weren’t being learned from the parents, if they had the time which I’ve been told they didn’t really. Hunters of larger animals could spend days looking for prey in order to feed the tribe. The work of preparing and preserving the meat had to be done quickly in some sense, but preservation was also done. The entire animal was used so there were tools to make tent repairs to be made or clothing to be made.


Given the way some Native Americans ran buffalo over cliffs, as did Neanderthal with their prey, hunting could not have been all that difficulty.

Any form of training was a group matter. Think I mentioned the USA Peace Corps worker who, for a little time, could not understand why every child in the village he was working in called every adult Mummy or Daddy?

We really have lost the plot.
 
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by Reed N D Dark:

Reed, can you do me a personal favour, please?

Read and tell me your personal perception of Ion Idriess.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ion_Idriess

http://adb.anu.edu.au/biograph...s-ion-llewellyn-6786
 
Posts: 5046 | Location: Queensland, Australia | Mbr Since: 05-05-2017Report This Post
Devoted...
Picture of That JR Thang
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quote:
Originally posted by Allan:
quote:
Originally posted by That JR Thang:
I have a book around here somewhere on the ancient mythologies...maybe someday I'll manage to get a round tuit...Smile   :)


The key lies in understanding the ancients were far closer to nature than we can possibly be today.

Think animism.

For most, that was a primitive concept based on ignorance.

But was it?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Animism
Animism (from Latin anima, "breath, spirit, life")[1][2] is the religious belief that objects, places and creatures all possess a distinct spiritual essence.[3][4][5][6] Potentially, animism perceives all things—animals, plants, rocks, rivers, weather systems, human handiwork and perhaps even words—as animated and alive. Animism is the world's oldest religion, "Animism predates any form of organized religion and is said to contain the oldest spiritual and supernatural perspective in the world. It dates back to the Paleolithic Age, to a time when... humans roamed the plains hunting and gathering, and communing with the Spirit of Nature."[7]
...Animism encompasses the beliefs that all material phenomena have agency, that there exists no hard and fast distinction between the spiritual and physical (or material) world and that soul or spirit or sentience exists not only in humans, but also in other animals, plants, rocks, geographic features such as mountains or rivers or other entities of the natural environment, including thunder, wind and shadows. Animism thus rejects Cartesian dualism[citation needed]. Animism may further attribute souls to abstract concepts such as words, true names or metaphors in mythology. Some members of the non-tribal world also consider themselves animists (such as author Daniel Quinn, sculptor Lawson Oyekan and many contemporary Pagans).[12]

Can't get any closer to unity than that.

Think totems. In Australia, if one belongs with the Possum totem, eating possums is off-limits. One way of making sure food animals are not wiped out. I remember telling of the young white girl sitting on the edge of a billabong wishing she could wipe out the black ants which were biting her:

"But they's my rellies (relatives)," her young tribal friend bewailed.

quote:
Oh, and please tell us what you found on the Censored   :censored: (rooster) partridge.


My goodness, we are being delicate, aren't we.

Google **** partridge mating dance in mythology and take your pick.

Think, too, on just how close to nature even city Greeks were.

It's when one traces mythologies such as those of the Greeks back to their origin that one begins to understand the unity of the ancients. I think of those observant hunter-gatherers who noticed certain birds and animals disappearing shortly before the cold weather arrived, returning to herald the return of the sun; not hard to imagine them associating those migrations with the weather then, perhaps, deciding the weather was dictated by the birds and animals themselves.

Imagine, too, those in cold countries watching the sun move away and hoping desperately it will return. Cultures all over the world have markers tracing the exact movement of the sun. Sitting out the back feeding the birds has brought that home in a big way; amazing just how far the sun travels.

We take it all for granted, however in an ASC one easily identifies with those ancient people, understands more deeply how they perceived life.

Then think of the three days when it stopped before it came back.

Same three days when the moon "dies", after being virgin, mother, and crone. Will have to try to find a source which dates that moon death back tens of thousands of years.

I remember posting a tribal story about an innocent man accidentally killed in a ritual battle. His mother went to his spirit tree and had to wait three days before his spirit arrived; tree, wooden cross, three days in Hell.

https://www.warpaths2peacepipe...ilt-birds-canoes.htm
Now Partridge thought, "If a boat with two ends sails two ways, why, then, a boat, that is round, will sail every way." So he built a canoe like a nest, perfectly round. And when it was finished, he called together all the birds to watch him put out to sea. And as they looked at the round canoe, they all cried out: "What a wonderful boat! We were not wise enough to think of such a thing!"

Synchronicity yet again. Remember I posted the link to the documentary saying Noah's ark actually was a giant coracle? At least that one worked, but it makes one wonder...

http://www.native-languages.org/legends-partridge.htm
Regardless, none of these three birds are mentioned very often in Native American folklore or traditional stories, except as a food source. When they do appear, partridge are usually portrayed as foolish and gullible birds or as inept spouses and parents. An exception is the Mi'kmaq tragic hero Pulowech (translated as "Partridge" in English, though one of our Mi'kmaq volunteers identified him as a ruffed grouse), who behaves bravely and honorably. The Chippewa tribe also uses the grouse as one of its clan animals; this clan, too, is frequently called the Partridge Clan in older documents (although the Ojibwe name of the clan and its totem, Aagask, refers specifically to a prairie grouse.) The Cherokee also have a Partridge Dance among their tribal dance traditions; the Cherokee word refers to a quail.

Thinking about all this...

I can well understand the ancients observing animal and plant life and drawing on it for their understanding of other natural phenomena.

Noah's ark? Here I was thinking it was but a myth Smile   :)


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Fence straddlers get a crotch full of splinters -- Granny
 
Posts: 6590 | Location: Atlanta | Mbr Since: 05-01-2017Report This Post
Devoted...
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quote:
Originally posted by Reed N D Dark:
Originally posted by That JR Thang:
doomsday


quote:
Since hops can and was used to make bad water safe to drink, I can envision the need for more of it in the reasonably near future.

Yep...


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Fence straddlers get a crotch full of splinters -- Granny
 
Posts: 6590 | Location: Atlanta | Mbr Since: 05-01-2017Report This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Allan:
I really do not understand why you focus so much on the Hebrews. After all, they were a rebellious breakaway group of Semites who spent most of their time trailing their goat herds around the Fertile Crescent, where they cobbled together bits and pieces from the mythologies of everyone from Egypt to Sumer.


Some of those bits and pieces relate to Zoroaster who I think relates to the very ancient religion of the Steppes as well as to the very recent religion of modern channeling.

quote:
Mythology has the major aim of uniting people and, as we still see every day, the Abrahamic religions have failed dismally in this.

Certainly they have picked up valuable lessons from the greater civilisations, but they broke the sacred law by creating disunity, even among their own people, a disunity which endangers us all today.


Yeah as Godel said, "Religions are for the most part bad, but religion is not".

quote:
Even the Romans, with their world-controlling military and economic power, had no problem with the beliefs of most they conquered.

It is a clear example they had no real issues with the Jews when we see how they went out of their way to eliminate the Druid priests, whom they saw as a real political threat. The Jews, like the later Christians, were looked upon as atheistic heathens.

By all means focus on the true spiritual religions which developed thousands of years after we settled down to farming, but remember how many of those Middle East city States fought only to expand their territories, not to eliminate the religions of others.


Oh Yeah Julius Caesar was JFK-like very much on his way towards dealing with corruption and that was the main problem for all including the Jews:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...rms_of_Julius_Caesar

quote:
The constitutional reforms of Julius Caesar were a series of laws pertaining to the Constitution of the Roman Republic enacted between 49 and 44 BC, during Caesar's dictatorship. Caesar died in 44 BC before the implications of his constitutional actions could be realized.

During his early career, Caesar had seen how chaotic and dysfunctional the Roman Republic had become. The republican machinery had broken down under the weight of imperialism, the central government had become powerless, the provinces had been transformed into independent principalities under the absolute control of their governors, and the army had replaced the constitution as the means of accomplishing political goals. With a weak central government, political corruption had spiraled out of control, and the status quo had been maintained by a corrupt aristocracy, which saw no need to change a system which had made all of its members quite rich.


http://jewishencyclopedia.com/...-caesar-caius-julius

quote:
Renan ascribes to Cæsar very broad and liberal views. "He truly conceived," he says, "liberty of conscience in a sense of absolute neutrality in the state, as enlightened nations now do. He desired the freedom of all provincial worship, and, if he had lived, he doubtless would have prevented the reaction toward strictness which, from the days of Tiberius, led the central government to insist on too much preponderance for the Roman worship. The Jews in Alexandria had their privileges confirmed. The free exercise of Jewish worship was stipulated in the principal towns of Asia Minor. The Jews throughout the world regretted the death of the dictator. Among the numerous provincials who mourned the Ides of March, it was remarked that Jews for several months came to make final lamentation over his burial-place" ("Histoire du Peuple d'Israel," v. 196, 197).


The death of this JC is the one that really was for the Jews, the death of a Cyrus the Great-like messiah. This JC though was very much worried by those mystic druids. A modern channeling quote from this JC:

quote:
Q: (Atriedes) Do you mind if your memory and image is used in a religion?

A: As long as it is with understanding of the truth. What is religion anyway but that which binds people together as is showed with my army.


quote:
For me, that is the area we need to focus on, so far as that particular region of the world is concerned. We need to know more about the origin of the Sumerians, more, too, about the important Indo-Europeans who helped change the region.


I tend to think Sumer was an Atlantis/Sundaland outpost and Indo-Europeans were part of Sundaland and also in northern outposts like Siberia.
 
Posts: 1149 | Location: Tucson, AZ | Mbr Since: 04-23-2009Report This Post
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In honor of yet more kids who died today, not only the ones in Texas, a song about a much older school shooting,

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xeP2LTnYrIY


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
bryan j borich
 
Posts: 486 | Location: CA | Mbr Since: 05-02-2017Report This Post
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Allan,

Just heard an interview, most likely this one, and thought of you!

https://www.npr.org/sections/h...ence-of-psychedelics
 
Posts: 12607 | Location: Central PA | Mbr Since: 05-14-2017Report This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by bryan:
In honor of yet more kids who died today, not only the ones in Texas, a song about a much older school shooting,

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xeP2LTnYrIY


I remember when the first students were shot in Texas University, over 50 years ago! It seems to me that we still haven’t figured out how to recognize or help those that need emotional support! Around that time we lost a vice presidential candidate because he HAD sought help for his depression, and most likely managed it. That brought the stigma back to the forefront of discussion but it seems we are still, as a nation, unable to get people who need help the help they need. Nor are we making it easier for treatment to be sought.
 
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Devoted...
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quote:
Originally posted by Reed N D Dark:
Allan,
Just heard an interview, most likely this one, and thought of you!
https://www.npr.org/sections/h...ence-of-psychedelics


Apart from the fact that a food author knew so little about mushrooms, it almost seems as if he has been reading my posts and decided I might be on the right track High 5   :high5:
 
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quote:
Originally posted by That JR Thang:
I can well understand the ancients observing animal and plant life and drawing on it for their understanding of other natural phenomena.


I used to watch out for ants moving to higher places, a sure sign that heavy rain was on the way.

How much else are we missing that our distant ancestors understood fully?

I see at least one of our States, after some 200 years of thinking about it, has finally decided to employ local Indigenous people as rangers, to care for the land they have lived in, in the same way they have been doing for tens of thousands of years.

quote:
Noah's ark? Here I was thinking it was but a myth Smile   :)


You must have seen me doing my block with hard-core atheists who insist there never was any such flood despite all the geological and other evidence that we have indeed been subjected to floods, the nature of which would have made those affected believe it was the end of the world as they knew it.
 
Posts: 5046 | Location: Queensland, Australia | Mbr Since: 05-05-2017Report This Post
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Picture of Reed N D Dark
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Allan:
quote:
Originally posted by Reed N D Dark:
Allan,
Just heard an interview, most likely this one, and thought of you!
https://www.npr.org/sections/h...ence-of-psychedelics


Apart from the fact that a food author knew so little about mushrooms, it almost seems as if he has been reading my posts and decided I might be on the right track High 5   :high5:


The interview was excellent as it discussed the coming 3rd phase of FDA approval. I couldn’t help but think you’d want a test group nearby. After reading the Book about altered states that was sharmans etc. I had come to wonder why the need for external stimuli..
 
Posts: 12607 | Location: Central PA | Mbr Since: 05-14-2017Report This Post
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Picture of Reed N D Dark
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quote:
Originally posted by Allan:
quote:
Originally posted by That JR Thang:
I can well understand the ancients observing animal and plant life and drawing on it for their understanding of other natural phenomena.


I used to watch out for ants moving to higher places, a sure sign that heavy rain was on the way.

How much else are we missing that our distant ancestors understood fully?

I see at least one of our States, after some 200 years of thinking about it, has finally decided to employ local Indigenous people as rangers, to care for the land they have lived in, in the same way they have been doing for tens of thousands of years.

quote:
Noah's ark? Here I was thinking it was but a myth Smile   :)


You must have seen me doing my block with hard-core atheists who insist there never was any such flood despite all the geological and other evidence that we have indeed been subjected to floods, the nature of which would have made those affected believe it was the end of the world as they knew it.


I live in a state where the famous groundhog is still celebrated!

But, in seriousness there a lot of old wives tales and remedies that we do know are based in science that we know now!

As for employing indigenous people I worked with a tree service who was hiring mostly workers from Honduras’ rain forests. They loved the trees, were dedicated workers, and were careful to care for the trees.
 
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quote:
Originally posted by Allan:
I really do not understand why you focus so much on the Hebrews. After all, they were a rebellious breakaway group of Semites who spent most of their time trailing their goat herds around the Fertile Crescent, where they cobbled together bits and pieces from the mythologies of everyone from Egypt to Sumer.


quote:
Some of those bits and pieces relate to Zoroaster who I think relates to the very ancient religion of the Steppes as well as to the very recent religion of modern channeling.


As I said earlier my experience with mediums has not been positive. What have you learned from them?

quote:
Yeah as Godel said, "Religions are for the most part bad, but religion is not".


That is where I extend JR's Churchianity concept. If the various versions of the Abrahamic religions lived up to their claims we would be living in a far better world.

Have to say in fairness, though, there seem to be far more high-level clerics now speaking out against all our Christian sins. Muslims, too, are now speaking out against most jihadists, though I have yet to see any call them infidels which, in fact, they are.

quote:
Oh Yeah Julius Caesar was JFK-like very much on his way towards dealing with corruption and that was the main problem for all including the Jews:


During his early career, Caesar had seen how chaotic and dysfunctional the Roman Republic had become.

We have more than enough knowledge from the past to ensure our politicians and CEOs know exactly how to behave.

Had a big win here when the first "illegal" Federal Parliamentarians were exposed. Knew immediately the brown stuff was headed for the fan. No dual-citizen Aussie can run for Parliament. When the first villain was exposed I knew it was the tip of the iceberg. Sure enough,all major Parties are paying the price, with a number now having to face by-elections. Even the Deputy Prime Minister was caught in the trap.

https://www.theguardian.com/au...or-and-four-mps-quit
The latest twist in the saga brings to 14 the number of parliamentarians who have resigned or been ruled ineligible since mid-2017, when renewed scrutiny on a constitutional clause set politicians scrambling to prove they only had Australian citizenship.

Confucius said it all many centuries ago. Why on earth we do not demand that all aspiring pollies and business leaders must spend at least 12 months studying what Confucius and so many others said before they can nominate is beyond me.

quote:
Q: (Atriedes) Do you mind if your memory and image is used in a religion?
A: As long as it is with understanding of the truth. What is religion anyway but that which binds people together as is showed with my army.


Even he agrees with me.

quote:
I tend to think Sumer was an Atlantis/Sundaland outpost and Indo-Europeans were part of Sundaland and also in northern outposts like Siberia.


Why, then, can our leaders not allocate more money for essential archaeology instead of treating themselves to the top Bordeaux wines ($5000 a bottle) and million-dollar-plus cars and planes?

Baigent is appropriately cautious, however I'm on his side when it comes to exploring both Antarctica and the submerged lands off the shores of Morocco and Portugal for Atlantis.

I'm sticking with "relatively" advanced. Maybe the reason Egypt and Sumer turned to building with stone is the survivors saw what happened to their mud-brick buildings.

Given modern fears about the stability of the mid-Atlantic ridge, there could well have been massive seismic disruptions there.
https://whc.unesco.org/en/activities/504/
 
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quote:
Originally posted by Reed N D Dark:
quote:
Originally posted by bryan:
In honor of yet more kids who died today, not only the ones in Texas, a song about a much older school shooting,

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xeP2LTnYrIY


I remember when the first students were shot in Texas University, over 50 years ago! It seems to me that we still haven’t figured out how to recognize or help those that need emotional support! Around that time we lost a vice presidential candidate because he HAD sought help for his depression, and most likely managed it. That brought the stigma back to the forefront of discussion but it seems we are still, as a nation, unable to get people who need help the help they need. Nor are we making it easier for treatment to be sought.


If anything it seems we've made it worse with technology.


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bryan j borich
 
Posts: 486 | Location: CA | Mbr Since: 05-02-2017Report This Post
Settling in...
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by That JR Thang:
quote:
Originally posted by Reed N D Dark:
Originally posted by That JR Thang:
doomsday


quote:
Since hops can and was used to make bad water safe to drink, I can envision the need for more of it in the reasonably near future.

Yep...


A new name for you in my semi-dream time.

The Incredible Shrinking Woman.....


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bryan j borich
 
Posts: 486 | Location: CA | Mbr Since: 05-02-2017Report This Post
Devoted...
Picture of That JR Thang
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Allan:
[QUOTE]Originally posted by That JR Thang:
I can well understand the ancients observing animal and plant life and drawing on it for their understanding of other natural phenomena.


quote:
Allan:I used to watch out for ants moving to higher places, a sure sign that heavy rain was on the way.

How much else are we missing that our distant ancestors understood fully?

In winter I watch for the black birds flying south. A sure sign that in 7-8 days a cold front will be moving in. They fly south to stay out in front of the cold weather.

quote:
Allan: I see at least one of our States, after some 200 years of thinking about it, has finally decided to employ local Indigenous people as rangers, to care for the land they have lived in, in the same way they have been doing for tens of thousands of years.

Better late than never?

quote:
JR: Noah's ark? Here I was thinking it was but a myth Smile   :)

Allan: You must have seen me doing my block with hard-core atheists who insist there never was any such flood despite all the geological and other evidence that we have indeed been subjected to floods, the nature of which would have made those affected believe it was the end of the world as they knew it.

Well yeah, there is no denying there was a flood, but about that 'ark' full of animals and only 8 humans...?


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Fence straddlers get a crotch full of splinters -- Granny
 
Posts: 6590 | Location: Atlanta | Mbr Since: 05-01-2017Report This Post
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